Trinitarian Christianity

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A number of good books and articles have been written in the last 20-30 years on the centrality and importance of the Trinity in Christian theology. One of the best has been Michael Reeves book “Delighting in the Trinity.” He writes: “‘God is love’: those three words could hardly be more bouncy. They seem lively, lovely and as warming as a crackling fire. But ‘God is a Trinity’? No, hardly the same effect: that just sounds cold and stodgy. All quite understandable, but the aim of this book is to stop the madness. Yes, the Trinity can be presented as a dusty and irrelevant dogma, but the truth is that God is love because God is a Trinity.”

St. Patrick’s Prayer is quite well known for the words: “Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me, Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me…” But the beginning and end of this song are often neglected among us: “I arise today through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity, through belief in the Threeness, through confession of the Oneness of the Creator of creation.”

Just this last week I had to prepare a teaching sermon on Lord’s Day 8 in the Heidelberg Catechism. This of course, is on the subject of the divine Trinity. It was a good week, I sat down and decided to use the sermon of the Apostle Peter to the crowd in Jerusalem as my main text. Of course, the rest of the sermon had me going all over the Bible to show the glory of the Trinity in the prayers, praise, greetings, and blessings of the Apostles and all over the Gospels. It was intimidating since this about God and these truths are so deep. It also brought me to reflect on how a truth that has been so central to the church for 2000 years is so undervalued today.

I have encountered modalist heresies that actually do teach falsehoods about Christ. There is this idea afoot in Toronto that God is one person who changes his clothing to Father clothing and then Spirit clothing. Such groups might even teach that we must only baptize in the Name of Jesus. This of course, is in direct conflict with the clear teaching of Christ Himself in Matthew 28:16-20. 

I would wager that there is also a shift in modern day evangelicalism towards grounding orthodoxy in a right understanding of the person of Christ. This of course is a noble enterprise since liberalism has so heavily attacked the divine nature of Christ.

The problem with basing orthodoxy solely in orthodox language about the person of Christ is that sometimes the Trinity is sidelined. You cannot speak of Christ without speaking of the Trinity (or at least you must speak of the Trinity at some point). Christ reveals the glory of the Trinity to us: “For God, who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” (I Cor. 4:6). He brings us to a knowledge of the Triune God: ““And we know that the Son of God has come and has given us understanding, so that we may know him who is true; and we are in him who is true, in his Son Jesus Christ. He is the true God and eternal life. Little children, keep yourselves from idols.” (I John 5:20-21) Read the Gospel of John and you see very clearly the love that the Triune God contains within unity and community. 

This is why the Athanasian Creed combines its theological formulations in two parts: on the Trinity and on the incarnation of Christ. With regards to the first, it concludes in this way: “So in everything, as was said earlier, the unity in Trinity, and the Trinity in unity, is to be worshipped. Anyone then who desires to be saved should think thus about the Trinity.” With regards to the second, it begins this way: “But it is necessary for eternal salvation that one also believe in the incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ faithfully.”

The Apostle Paul delights in the Trinity and teaches this truth about God to his congregation in Ephesus in Ephesians 3:14–19 “For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named, that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith—that you, being rooted and grounded in love, may have strength to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge, that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.”

If we learn from the missionaries of old like St. Patrick, we should also inject our missional theology with more Trinitarian theology: “I arise today through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity, through belief in the Threeness, through confession of the Oneness of the Creator of creation.”


 

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